True Fiction

PassionMusesIn this world of rational materialism, people still turn to fiction. Some prefer it in the form of movies, television, or internet, but those of us “old school” like our fiction in print. No matter how we take it, fiction appeals to that part of us that makes us human—our range of emotions. This became clear to me in The Passionate Muse: Exploring Emotion in Stories. As a typical human, I spend a good part of my mental energy trying to make sense of things. Our social existence can be quite confusing and isn’t always rational. If you doubt this, read the headlines. Keith Oatley offers insight into psychology, or mental life in general, with this little book. We read stories because we like to find ourselves caught up in emotions. Successful writers can draw us into the fictional world not with reason, but with feeling. We seek emotional satisfaction and what we can’t do in fact, we can in fiction.

This aspect of human existence also plays into religious texts. Those of us raised to read sacred texts literally lose a lot of what they have to offer. Fact may tell us what to believe, but fiction helps us learn to feel. Thinking, as many cognitive scientists now believe, incorporates both rational and emotional information. Reality, in other words, isn’t purely reasonable. We interpret things. We interpret with our guts as much as with our heads. This combination of different ways of understanding the world—and the society—around us blends into a distinctly human milieu. We can’t reason our way out of emotions. They are who we are.

While teaching full-time I found myself turning to novels to recover from all the research I was doing. Reading only non-fiction (which, I suppose, is what The Passionate Muse might be) can lead to a lopsided view of life. I’ve had colleagues tell me that fiction is for others—non-academics, those who don’t have the weight of the intellectual world upon their shoulders all the time. Interestingly, since I’ve allowed myself to read more fiction I’ve discovered that the wisdom embedded in stories often surpasses that of erudite monographs. Scholarly literature, of course, has its place. Still, it leaves room on the plate for desert as well. Oatley builds his academic study around a fictional story he wrote to show what he wanted to tell. The rational meets the imaginative. I feel more human already.

2 responses to “True Fiction

  1. Brent Snavely

    >We interpret with our guts as much as with our heads.<

    "…1 Significant decreases in experienced feelings of anger, sexual excitement, fear, and an over-all estimate of change were found.
    2 A significant increase in feelings of sentimentality was reported.
    3 Although spinal cord lesions decrease some emotional feelings, overt emotional behavior may continue to be displayed.
    4 Support was offered for the belief that disruption of the autonomic nervous system and its afferent return causes notable changes in experienced emotional feelings. A trend was noted which suggests that the more extensive the disruption, the greater the decrease in some emotional feelings."

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-8986.1966.tb02690.x/abstract;jsessionid=576761E6386BC39BECDEAD5EAEC3CC71.f02t04

    Like

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