Love the Craft

It is a cold, windy New England day in November. You find yourself in Providence. How can you not visit the gravesite of H. P. Lovecraft? I have mentioned Lovecraft before, in my podcast on Dagon, but that brief citation does not give credit to a man whose life provides episodes that feel strangely familiar to me. Barely known as a writer in his own lifetime, Lovecraft had difficulty finding employment and had a fascination with ancient gods. Indeed, I discovered Lovecraft while researching Dagon for a serious presentation and soon students were telling me about the Cthulhu (I would not dare attempt to pronounce) Mythos and how I had only scratched the surface of his writing.

Lovecraft’s fascination with ancient gods brought new life to forgotten entities. Dagon, despite being a major deity of ancient Mesopotamia, would likely have been completely forgotten by all but professors of arcane mythology had not Lovecraft resurrected him, albeit in a fishy form. His fascination with the protagonists of ancient myths, nearly forgotten deities, clearly influenced Neil Gaiman in his American Gods, and has preserved for the modern reader some of the fascination with powerful, ancient forces that show the insignificance of humanity. I found reading American Gods while in Providence a very humbling experience. Lovecraft also gave the world Arkham, the asylum of Batman fame, as well as Miskatonic University.

Along with Melville and Poe, Lovecraft deserves a place of honor in the pantheon of American literary explorers. The assortment of gifts left for him at his tombstone, including a small cairn, pennies, a pen, and even a note reading “thank you for the ideas,” attests his local fame. The prominence of his books at neighborhood bookstores assured me that I was not the only traveler to breathe in the air that Lovecraft exhaled. My visit also brought to mind a story that a friend of mine started to write some years ago. It had something to do with ancient gods coming back to life, although my friend had never heard of Lovecraft or Gaiman. Lovecraft’s spirit, it seems, may still be alive and well in Rhode Island and in the minds of other residents of Arkham.

Lovecraft

One thought on “Love the Craft

  1. GeorgeRic

    Lovecraft’s intrigue with the occult only emphasizes how mankind has forever felt that there is a world beyond out world. Agnostics are puzzled: Where is God? Why this confusion? But also: Why is there belief in the occult? How do the possessed levitate? Why are there provable ‘Miracles’? So true agnostics keep an open-mind, considering carefully new ideas that might logically explain these phenomena.
    Abbott, writing ‘Flatland’ explained contiguous geometric worlds to solve the difficulties. Now ‘Techie Worlds’ examines impossible concepts like trinity, resurrection, judgment, souls and more, showing they are logical and reasonable in the context of contiguous geometrical worlds. That is the way of science: to examine phenomena in the light of theory.
    Neither approach can be proved or dis-proved, but the advantages of life and nature weigh towards the Christian view, teaching the way of love.. ‘Techie Worlds’ (available from amazon.com) by explaining clearly how God does it, will bring Moslems and Jews to the teachings of Jesus. Techie Worlds is definitely not the same old harangue, but is logical, using a mechanistic basis for explaining how the worlds are built and how the Christian view is for real.
    GeorgeRic

    Like

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