Austin City Limits

Maybe it’s just because Texas feels like the brass buckle of the Bible Belt, but I had moral qualms about landing in George Bush International Airport this afternoon. Texas has so many worthy heroes, but in the land of Rick Perry, recent Republican politics is king. Not queen. But king. It felt like a work of supererogation to drive to Austin after a three-and-a-half hour flight to Houston, but Texas reminded me of Illinois with palm trees. And cacti. Well, okay, and longhorns. One could get culture-lash flying here from New York. Before I embarked I had visions of my rental car being a huge Cadillac with real steer horns for a hood ornament. I just couldn’t picture myself in a ten-gallon hat.

I sometimes wonder how religion could’ve come to divide a nation such as the United States. Founded on the principles of religious liberty, lately one party has been claiming the right to legislate morality for all, deeply polarizing a populace that should be able to accept differing viewpoints. Still, there are issues on which human rights insist there can be no compromise: women have equal rights with men, and have the right to self-determination just like men. It truly amazes me that such common sense can even become a divisive issue. If we could agree on even that, we’d have to declare it progress over the objections of the Religious Right. My thoughts wander that way when I tarry in the south. It’s really a pity. The people are friendly here and the landscape has its own beauty. Are we really that different?

I’m not altogether convinced that this isn’t just a case of prejudice masking as religious sensibility. Religions can be all too gullible when they feel their honors might have been impugned. While I regularly express my opinion here, I do respect nearly every form of sincerely held religious belief. None of us has all the answers, and it seems the height of hypocrisy to insist that anyone is right all the time. Nevertheless, my sojourn beneath the Bible Belt has me wondering about the origins of various religious squabbles. Or maybe it was the just the long drive along the “presidential corridor” after touching down at an facility that most websites still refer to as simply, Houston International Airport. Travel broadens the mind—it is, in fact, an excellent form of education. Maybe if we got out more we would all get along better.

From here we all look the same.

From here we all look the same.

2 thoughts on “Austin City Limits

  1. Neither Houston nor Austin represent the crimson badge that Texas represents on the electoral map. Houston is purple. Austin is pretty blue. It’s the rural areas and (to a lesser extent) Dallas that turn the state red.

    It can be pretty religiously diverse down here, too. The Houston area has Hindu mandirs, Buddhist temples, Lukumi houses, and Quaker fellowships in addition to every flavor of Christianity. Even us Pagans have our little gatherings; depending on which route you took to Austin, you might have passed pretty close to one of our festival grounds.

    Then again, I moved here from Mississippi, so Texas was a step up for me. Enjoy your trip!

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  2. Thanks, Omorka–indeed, I know better than to generalize! Austin definitely struck me as blue, and there is a rich diversity in the places I’ve been. I spotted a Pagan campus group ad right beneath a Young Republican group on the UT campus. Diversity rules!

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